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Posts Tagged ‘Kathy C. Lynn MD’

Kathy C. Lynn, MD: Choosing a Food Dehydrator

An avid gardener, Kathy C. Lynn, MD, strives to eat home- and locally-grown foods year round by preserving her own harvest. Professionally, Dr. Lynn treats patients at her private practice in Macon, Georgia. She specializes in rheumatology and internal medicine.

If you’re interested in preserving fruits, vegetables, and even meats, dehydration is a simple and delicious way to save fresh foods for later use. There are numerous brands and options when it comes to purchasing a food dehydrator, but the two main types are shelf tray and stackable dehydrators. Begin the process by determining how large an appliance you want or need; today, many manufacturers make conveniently-sized dehydrators that easily fit onto a counter top.

Next, research dehydrators that provide even heat and air flow. In less expensive stackable dehydrators, the bottom trays often receive excess heat. Quality shelf tray and stackable dehydrators will dry food evenly without requiring tray rotation.

Once you have a few models in mind, examine the dehydrators’ construction and quality. It’s also useful to consider what types of items you will be drying, as a shelf tray dehydrator can dry taller food items. Alternatively, stackable dehydrators can be expanded by purchasing more trays. Regardless of which type you choose, a high-quality food dehydrator will allow you to enjoy the summer harvest for winters to come.

Rheumatic Diseases

As a privately practicing physician of rheumatology and internal medicine in Macon, Georgia, Kathy C. Lynn, MD, treats patients diagnosed with rheumatic diseases. While there are many illnesses that fit into this category, rheumatic diseases are characterized by pain and inflammation in joints and muscles. Here, Dr. Lynn discusses some common forms of rheumatic disease.

      rheumatoid_arthritis    download

1. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA): This condition is an autoimmune disease, a disease in which the body is attacked by its own immune system. More than one million Americans suffer from RA, and the disease manifests disproportionately in women. Doctors can diagnose RA, which is characterized by pain, swelling and stiffness in the joints, with a blood test and x-rays.

2. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS): Another autoimmune disease, this painful condition is more common in men than women and manifests as a gradual fusing and stiffening of the spine. People with AS often notice the onset as pain and stiffness in the sacroiliac region, which gradually, over the course of months or years, works its way up the spine. Like rheumatoid arthritis, AS may be diagnosed with x-rays and physical examination findings.

Georgia’s Altamaha River Offers a Life-Nourishing Coastal Ecosystem, Prepared by Kathy C. Lynn, M.D.

As a longtime resident of Georgia, Kathy C. Lynn, M.D., cares deeply about protecting the natural environment. Kathy C. Lynn, M.D., supports local organizations, such as the Georgia Wilderness Society and the Altamaha River Keepers (ARK). Based in Darien, Georgia, ARK serves as a grassroots organization, with a minimal budget and dedicated core of volunteers.

The Altamaha River starts at the confluence of the Oconee River and the Ocmulgee River, near Lumber City. Flowing for 137 eastward miles through southern Georgia to the Atlantic Ocean, the Altamaha is one of the state’s major rivers. Notably, the river has no dams along its course. With no dams barring the flow of water, tidal currents begin to exert force on the Altamaha River some 60 to 65 miles from the coast. The water is still fresh at this point, presenting a unique freshwater tidal ecosystem. Interestingly, the salt line is variable depending on the season and yearly precipitation levels. At its highest, the river churns fresh water straight to the coast, moving the salt line offshore. However, this is the exception to the rule: the salt line has been steadily pushing inward for several decades due to drought conditions and rising sea levels.

The coastal environment that the Altamaha River feeds is remarkably diverse. Near the coast, the river separates into a number of arms, forming a delta environment rich in aquatic and terrestrial life. Indeed, the region is known as the “Little Amazon” due to its high density and diversity of plants and animals, similar to that of a tropical environment. The effects of the river’s ecosystem range far beyond the delta itself. During high water, the Altamaha river sheets up and disperses through numerous coastal swamplands, affecting as much as half of the entire Georgia coastline.

Altamaha River Keepers plays a key role in maintaining the environmental health of the river, aggressively monitoring pollution and targeting those who cause watershed degradation. In response to citizen complaints, the group finds the source of the chemical and biological pollution. After performing a detailed inspection, ARK determines which government agency is best suited to address the problem. If the agency’s response is insufficient, ARK occasionally resorts to legal action.

Kathy C. Lynn, M.D. has served the Macon, Georgia, community through her private practice in internal medicine and rheumatology since 1995.

Georgia’s Altamaha-fed coastal marshes are rich in biodiversity. Here, Jones Marsh, viewed from the Wormsloe historic site near Savannah, Georgia. Author: Brian Stansberry. Posted at Wikimedia Commons

Georgia’s Altamaha River Offers a Life-Nourishing Coastal Ecosystem,

Prepared by Kathy C. Lynn, M.D.

Georgia’s Altamaha-fed coastal marshes are rich in biodiversity. Here, Jones Marsh, viewed from the Wormsloe historic site near Savannah, Georgia.

As a longtime resident of Georgia, Kathy C. Lynn, M.D., cares deeply about protecting the natural environment. Kathy C. Lynn, M.D., supports local organizations, such as the Georgia Wilderness Society and the Altamaha River Keepers (ARK). Based in Darien, Georgia, ARK serves as a grassroots organization, with a minimal budget and dedicated core of volunteers.

The Altamaha River starts at the confluence of the Oconee River and the Ocmulgee River, near Lumber City. Flowing for 137 eastward miles through southern Georgia to the Atlantic Ocean, the Altamaha is one of the state’s major rivers. Notably, the river has no dams along its course. With no dams barring the flow of water, tidal currents begin to exert force on the Altamaha River some 60 to 65 miles from the coast. The water is still fresh at this point, presenting a unique freshwater tidal ecosystem. Interestingly, the salt line is variable depending on the season and yearly precipitation levels. At its highest, the river churns fresh water straight to the coast, moving the salt line offshore. However, this is the exception to the rule: the salt line has been steadily pushing inward for several decades due to drought conditions and rising sea levels.

The coastal environment that the Altamaha River feeds is remarkably diverse. Near the coast, the river separates into a number of arms, forming a delta environment rich in aquatic and terrestrial life. Indeed, the region is known as the “Little Amazon” due to its high density and diversity of plants and animals, similar to that of a tropical environment. The effects of the river’s ecosystem range far beyond the delta itself. During high water, the Altamaha river sheets up and disperses through numerous coastal swamplands, affecting as much as half of the entire Georgia coastline.

Altamaha River Keepers plays a key role in maintaining the environmental health of the river, aggressively monitoring pollution and targeting those who cause watershed degradation. In response to citizen complaints, the group finds the source of the chemical and biological pollution. After performing a detailed inspection, ARK determines which government agency is best suited to address the problem. If the agency’s response is insufficient, ARK occasionally resorts to legal action.

Kathy C. Lynn, M.D. has served the Macon, Georgia, community through her private practice in internal medicine and rheumatology since 1995.